Every industry is fair game for hackers. One mistake with any account information like reusing or sharing passwords and your organization can be shaken down for millions. So remember to practice good cybersecurity: do not reuse passwords, always confirm whom you are sharing sensitive information with, and be careful when clicking on suspicious links.

Share this post with your friends as a reminder to why “password” should not be their password. 

Photo by Franco Antonio Giovanella on Unsplash

 

 

An unidentified user was able to stream Clubhouse audio feeds this weekend from “multiple rooms” into their own third-party website, said Reema Bahnasy, a spokeswoman for Clubhouse. While the company says it’s “permanently banned” that particular user and installed new “safeguards” to prevent a repeat, researchers contend the platform may not be in a position to make such promises.

 

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Kia seems to be in quite a predicament… the automaker’s online services appear to have been severed from the outside world, with customers unable to start their cars remotely via Kia’s apps or even log into the company’s financing website to pay their bills. All signs pointed to a potential cyberattack against Kia—ransomware most likely—and that’s exactly what a new report is claiming it is.

 


If you suspect your information has been part of a data leak, use HackNotice Instant Check for free and see if your data is being shared by hackers. Simply click HERE and enter the information you want checked.


 

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There’s a popular stereotype that Apple’s computers are largely immune to malware. Not only is that incorrect, it appears that sophisticated hacker(s) might have been toying with the idea of a heist or drop nasty enough they’d have needed to cover their tracks. 

 

Photo by Christian Lue on Unsplash

 

 

MORE THAN FOUR years after a mysterious group of hackers known as the Shadow Brokers began wantonly leaking secret NSA hacking tools onto the internet, the question that debacle raised—whether any intelligence agency can prevent its “zero-day” stockpile from falling into the wrong hands—still haunts the security community. That wound has now been reopened, with evidence that Chinese hackers obtained and reused another NSA hacking tool years before the Shadow Brokers brought it to light.

 

Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

 

 

A ransomware-wielding gang has hit a Seattle-based billing and payment processing provider used by organizations and government agencies across California and Washington.

 


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