The Urology Center of Colorado (TUCC) On September 8, TUCC detected an attack that began September 7.  Their investigation revealed that patients’ name and one or more of the following data elements may have been date of birth, Social Security number, address, phone number, email address, medical record number, diagnosis, treating physician, insurance provider, treatment cost, and/or guarantor name. The incident has not yet appeared on HHS’s hack tool so we do not have any numbers yet for this one, but the notice suggests that access and any possible exfiltration was time-limited. Read their press release here. Note that TUCC had previously posted a notice on their web site about the incident on October 8, one month after detecting unusual activity. Strategic Benefits Advisors On September 19, the Georgia-headquartered benefits consulting firm learned that they were the victim of a ransomware attack. Their notice indicates that names, addresses, and Social Security numbers may have been accessed or acquired, but they do not mention whether any health information or health insurance information was involved, so it’s not clear what type of clients were impacted by this hack. Read their notice here. Victory Health Partners On September 23, Victory Health Partners in Alabama became aware of a ransomware incident that compromised some patients’ information such as name, address, social security number, date of birth, and other protected information. The clinic describes themselves as a faith-based clinic for uninsured adults. Of note, VHP uses a paper chart system, which may have limited the scope and impact of the attack: As Victory utilizes paper patient charts, there was no personal health information such as health conditions, diagnoses, etc. that was compromised. This incident has not (yet?) shown up on any dedicated leak site by any ransomware group. If it does, it will be interesting to see what they claim. The incident has also not shown up on HHS’s public hack tool at this point. Read VHP’s hack notice here.